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Insider Blog: The Bradford Effect

Posted Mar 31, 2010

Bradford's impact on KC; Preseason schedule on the way; Adam Zimmer is the right fit

Oklahoma’s Pro Day has come and gone, and apparently the entire football world now believes that the St. Louis Rams will take QB Sam Bradford with the first overall pick this April. Short and sweet, the guy was nails.

Thirty minutes of throwing, 63 passes in total, and a performance that reportedly “wowed” those in attendance; Bradford’s draft stock is officially soaring. Legendary NFL personnel man Gil Brandt (who we make it a point to interview every training camp) said that Bradford’s workout was the best that he’s seen since Troy Aikman.

Who left the door open for the pumpers? Currently, they’re all sprinting in Bradford’s direction.

Mock drafts are just that…mocks…not the real thing, but the thought of the Rams selecting Bradford actually does seem to make the most sense. It was already widely believed that St. Louis would take either a quarterback or one of the two defensive tackles (Oklahoma’s Gerald McCoy or Nebraska’s Ndamukong Suh) at the top of the draft. Now, when you add in Bradford’s workout, a St. Louis fan base that needs an energy boost, as well as the Rams draft history, and all signs point to Bradford.

Here is a franchise that has drafted on the defensive line in two of the last three years (DE Chris Long at #2 in 2008 and NT Adam Carriker at #12 in 2007). During that span of time the Rams have had a need to develop a franchise quarterback, yet passed on both Matt Ryan and Mark Sanchez. Most believe that the time is now for the Rams to draft a quarterback.

This could be a good situation for the Chiefs.

With Bradford going first overall, it’s generally assumed that the two defensive tackles will fall somewhere in the next three picks. Both Detroit and Washington could be interested at number two and four, and it would be quite a surprise if the Bucs didn’t go with the best available d-tackle at number three.

With the right set of circumstances, the Chiefs could potentially have the choice of the best available offensive tackle, S Eric Berry or even the best linebacker on the board at number five. It’s hard to see any Chiefs fans upset with that potential situation. NFL.com’s Michael Lombardi recently released a mock draft with featured that exact scenario.

Lombardi’s Mock Draft

1. St. Louis – QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma

2. Detroit – DT Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma

3. Tampa Bay – DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska

4. Washington – QB Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame

Lombardi then has Kansas City taking Berry and number five. Exactly who the Chiefs would take in this scenario doesn’t exactly matter for the time being. The point is that there would be a lot of open doors for the Chiefs should the draft shake down the way that Lombardi feels. Offensive line, safety and linebacker…all positions of need…all the best options still on the board.

Of course, there’s also the possibility that the Lions are looking to protect the backside of last year’s number one overal pick, QB Matt Stafford. If the Lions took an offensive tackle (say Oklahoma State’s Russell Okung) and Tampa followed suit with one of the defensive tackles, would the Redskins then be inclined to go quarterback over whoever is left between Suh or McCoy?

With both defensive tackles off the board and possibly the top offensive tackle on the Chiefs draft board as well, where would that leave the Chiefs. Would it really even matter? Say that Berry is the guy all along?

Like the NCAA tournament bracket, the NFL Draft is a cluster, with one unforeseen move setting off a domino of alternative endings. Remember those Choose Your Own Adventure books? Yeah, it’s kind of like that.

BUT…if the Rams take Bradford…

Want to open another can of worms? How about a scenario which see’s the Rams trade for Philadelphia QB Donovan McNabb. St. Louis does have an appealing pick at the top of the second round.

Oh, the humanity. This April should be fun.

2010 Preseason Schedule Out Today

At 2:00 PM (CST) today we’ll officially know what the Chiefs preseason schedule looks like for 2010. In addition to the preseason pairings, the NFL Office will also announce the national television schedule for preseason broadcasts as well.

Possibly the biggest question regarding the Chiefs exhibition lineup is the future of the annual Governor’s Cup contest vs. St. Louis. There have been rumblings that the game could be replaced in the final week of the preseason with a match=up at Arrowhead against Green Bay.

There hasn’t been any “hard news” out of Arrowhead about the possibility of a change, but this article in the Green Bay Press Gazette got the rumor mill churning a few weeks ago. NFL teams are permitted to schedule their own preseason finale.

The official verdict will come in this afternoon. Stay tuned.

Adam Zimmer Makes Sense

The father of the Chiefs newest assistant coach originally let the news slip nearly a month ago in a radio interview, but the hiring of Adam Zimmer was officially put into writing yesterday evening. Adam Zimmer’s official title in Kansas City will read: Defensive Assistant/Assistant Linebackers Coach.

The son of Cincinnati Bengals defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer, Kansas City’s version of Zimmer has rich ties to the current coaching staff. Viewed as a young, “up-and-comer,” Adam Zimmer previously worked with Chiefs linebackers coach Gary Gibbs in New Orleans. He has plenty of other ties to this staff as well.

Go right down the line and connect the dots of New Orleans head coach Sean Payton, as well as Saints assistant head coach Joe Vitt, and it’s easy to see how Zimmer pieces into Kansas City’s coaching staff.

Interestingly enough, Zimmer was a college teammate of Chiefs WR Jerheme Urban at Trinity (TX) University. Urban graduated in 2003, while Zimmer played safety and graduated in 2006.

Young, energetic coaches can play a big role in today’s NFL climate. It appears that the Chiefs might have something in Zimmer. He’s already fast at work with Todd Haley and the rest of the Chiefs coaching staff.

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